Classic Sega Console Gets Price Point

Retro gamers who want to go back to the joys of their youth better start getting their wallet primed. Sega and Atari are releasing classic editions of their consoles that will be ‘plug and play’. These new consoles give gamers the chance to go back and experience the classic games of yesteryear in the way that they were supposed to be experienced. These consoles have been hyped up for the better part of the past six months and it looks like we’ve finally got some real, solid details on what they will offer.

Sega is releasing their Sega Genesis Flashback which is a re-packaging of the classic Sega Genesis. The console itself will only run you a cool $80 and you’ll be getting something that is jam packed with features. The system will come loaded up with 85 different games including classics like ‘Mortal Kombat’, ‘Phantasy Star’ and ‘Shining Force’. The system will have a port in it for you to insert your classic Genesis cartridges and you should be able to play almost any game that you own. The console will have an HDMI output that keeps the quality at 720p and it will come with a pair of wireless, classic Genesis stylized controllers. Every game will have a save/rewind functionality, as well.

Atari is releasing their ‘Atari Flashback 8 Gold’ for $80 as well. The re-released game system has 120 games including some of the most famous titles of all time — ‘Space Invaders’ and ‘Frogger’. The console comes with two Atari 2600 controllers, both wireless, and the same 720p HDMI output we listed above.

Pre-orders for both systems will begin on July 28th through the AtGames company behind the production of the models. This news comes on the heels of another huge Atari announcement: they are creating a brand new console for ‘classic’ and ‘current’ content.

How Sonic the Hedgehog Was Almost Sonic the Rabbit

1988 saw the Japanese release of SEGA’s Mega Drive, or Genesis in the United States, placing it ahead of Nintendo’s SNES. The Mega Drive was one of the earliest 16-bit consoles and its expanded graphical options meant that a character like Sonic the Hedgehog could convey more colors as he zipped from left to right. While Sonic was the ultimate outcome of an internal design contest between SEGA’s Japanese and American offices that generated 200 characters, he was not among the initial offerings; the leading submissions in this contest was a long-eared rabbit with a bow tie drawn by Naoto Ohshima.

 

As the winner, Ohshima was partnered with programmer Yuji Naka and tasked with creating a rival to Nintendo’s Mario. Naka’s love of racing games and desire to make an innovative platformer fostered the need for a speed-focused character. In the duo’s presentation to SEGA’s board of directors, every aspect of its marketing pitch featured Ohshima’s rabbit. SEGA was pleased with the presentation and told them to take their material beyond a mere concept, adding Hirokazu Yasuhara to the team. Their primary directive was to produce a killer title that would boost sales of the Mega Drive and solidify a mascot for SEGA.

 

One of the first hiccups with a rabbit character came in his approach toward enemies; Ohshima’s character would use his ears to grab and toss enemies but this impaired the intention of high speed and required more button presses than seemed feasible. The team decided to rework the game to focus on minimal button presses and reduction of speed. These needs caused the team make a character that rolled into a ball when jumping, damaging enemies and breaking walls that the character collided with. The need for an animal known for balling itself up forced the team to discard the rabbit idea, eventually paring their biological survey down to an armadillo or hedgehog; the hedgehog’s quills won out over the armadillo’s armor.